blog

5 Social Engineering Tactics Hackers Use to Trick You

John Price
Chief Executive Officer
January 6, 2023
6 minutes

Social engineering attacks are a common and often successful tactic used by hackers to gain access to sensitive information or systems. These attacks rely on manipulating and exploiting human behavior and psychology rather than technical vulnerabilities.

Here are five common tactics that hackers use to trick you through social engineering attacks:

  1. Phishing

    Phishing is a type of social engineering attack that involves sending fake emails or texts that appear to be from a legitimate source, such as a bank or government agency. These emails or texts often contain a link that, when clicked, downloads malware or directs the victim to a fake website where they are prompted to enter sensitive information, such as login credentials or financial information.

  2. Baiting

    Baiting is a type of social engineering attack that involves offering the victim something that they desire, such as access to exclusive content or a prize, in exchange for sensitive information or access to a system. For example, a hacker may offer a victim free access to a premium service if they click on a link and enter their login credentials.

  3. Scareware

    Scareware is a type of social engineering attack that involves using fear and urgency to trick the victim into taking a specific action, such as downloading malware or paying for a fake service. For example, a hacker may send a victim an email claiming that their computer has been infected with a virus and urging them to download a "fix" that is actually malware.

  4. Impersonation

    Impersonation is a type of social engineering attack that involves pretending to be someone else, such as a trusted colleague or a customer service representative, to gain access to sensitive information or systems. For example, a hacker may call a victim pretending to be a colleague and request login credentials or access to a system.

  5. Physical social engineering

    Physical social engineering is a type of social engineering attack that involves manipulating the victim in person, rather than through electronic communication. This can include tactics such as shoulder surfing, dumpster diving, or tailgating, where the hacker gains access to a building or system by following someone who has legitimate access.

To protect against social engineering attacks, it is important to be aware of these tactics and to be cautious when asked to provide sensitive information or access to systems. Here are some tips to help you stay safe:

  1. Be suspicious of unsolicited emails or texts

    Don't click on links or download attachments from unknown sources, and be wary of emails or texts that contain urgent or threatening language.

  2. Be cautious of offers that seem too good to be true

    If you are offered something for free in exchange for sensitive information or access to a system, be cautious and do your research before taking the bait.

  3. Verify the identity of anyone requesting sensitive information

    If someone contacts you claiming to be a colleague or a customer service representative and asks for sensitive information, verify their identity before providing it.

  4. Use strong and unique passwords

    Use strong, unique passwords for all of your accounts and don't share them with anyone.

  5. Be aware of your surroundings

    When in public or at work, be aware of your surroundings and protect sensitive information from being observed or overheard by others.

By understanding these common tactics and taking steps to protect yourself, you can significantly reduce the risk of falling victim to a social engineering attack. Remember to be cautious and verify the identity and intentions of anyone requesting sensitive information or access to systems, and you can help protect yourself and your organization from these types of attacks

get started

Ready to get started?

Enquire here to speak to a member of the team
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Blog

Read similar posts.

Home
Capabilities
About
Contact